Four Possible Paths for the Book of Common Prayer – Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music

Our Book of Common Prayer, of course, unites us as Episcopalians. It is not a static document anymore than we are static Christ-followers. God is always working within us, and within our collective worship. Here is an example of God’s constant call to us to renew our lives in Christ and our faithful response to that call.

The Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music (SCLM) will be sending to General Convention 2018 four different paths forward for its consideration in regards to the Book of Common Prayer and liturgical renewal.  It will request that General Convention 2018 select one of the four paths that will chart the SCLM’s course for the 2018-2021, and 2021-2024 triennia.

Source: Four Possible Paths for the Book of Common Prayer – Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music

But Grace Awaits – Bishop’s Blog

Bishop Prior is the Episcopal Bishop of Minnesota. I commend his Advent meditation to you.

The Advent season invites us, dare I say challenges us, to NOT fill our waiting space. I know that sounds incredibly inefficient at best and uncomfortable at worst. However, when we allow our waiting space to be an empty place, in my experience, God’s grace begins to seep into our souls.

Source: But Grace Awaits – Bishop’s Blog

Black clergy encouraged to reclaim Jesus and his movement

[Episcopal News Service – Houston, Texas] Black clergy from across the Episcopal Church and parts of the Anglican Communion are spending more than four days here exploring how to reclaim the Episco…

A call to, an inspiration for all Episcopalians.

Source: Black clergy encouraged to reclaim Jesus and his movement

Mission to Seafarers

Screenshot 2016-08-08 13.40.31

Though Sea Sunday (July 10, 2016) has passed it is always the right time to reflect on the work others (like seafarers) do for the common good. Want to get an idea of how dependent we are on the sea, ships, and seafarers? Start with this article from Vox.com: This is an incredible visualization of the world’s shipping routes. The article features an interactive map that helps you visualize the extent of shipping traffic.

As a church we seek to minister to those who labor on ships and in ports throughout the world (including our own Port of San Diego). Here is more about the Mission to Seafarers (MtS):

What can I do?

Headline: Million of Syrian Refugees in needEpiscopal Church Responds to Syrian Refugee Crisis

Adapted from the Diocesan News of the Episcopal Diocese of San Diego:

Episcopal Relief & Development (ERD), the worldwide relief arm of the Episcopal Church, is working to collaborate with organizations active in transit countries such as Greece. Episcopal Migration Ministries suggests these actions for concerned Episcopalians:

  1.  pray;
  2. volunteer with one of our local resettlement partners to welcome new Americans: http://bit.ly/EMMpartners;
  3. join the #RefugeesWelcome global social media campaign urging governments to welcome refugees (ie. use hashtag #RefugeesWelcome in your Facebook posts, Tweets and Instagram posts);
  4. sign the White House petition asking the president to pledge to resettle at least 65,000 Syrians by 2016: http://1.usa.gov/1L6zh9l.

A Prayer for the Victims of the Syrian Conflict

We pray for those damaged by the fighting in Syria.
To the wounded and injured:
Come Lord Jesus.

To the terrified who are living in shock:
Come Lord Jesus.

To the hungry and homeless, refugee and exile:
Come Lord Jesus.

To those bringing humanitarian aid:
Give protection Lord Jesus.

To those administering medical assistance:
Give protection Lord Jesus.

To those offering counsel and care:
Give protection Lord Jesus.

For all making the sacrifice of love:
Give the strength of your Spirit
and the joy of your comfort.
In the hope of Christ we pray, Amen.

From the Church of England Prayers for Syria.

Remembering Mark, Evangelist

The beginning of the Gospel of Mark from the 7th century Book of DurrowApril 25 The Feast of St. Mark, Evangelist

“The beginning of the good news of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.” Mark 1:1 NRSV

Almighty God, by the hand of Mark the evangelist you have given to your Church the Gospel of Jesus Christ the Son of God: We thank you for this witness, and pray that we may be firmly grounded in its truth; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

 

The Book of Common Prayer, p. 240

Image: The beginning of the Gospel of Mark in the 7th century Book of Durrow. Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain.

Another voice for renewal

From the first moment on the balcony overlooking Piazza San Pietro Pope Francis initiated a renewal in the Roman Catholic church. This renewal will (because we are all connected) influence the lives of all Christians, no matter their denominational affiliation.
In celebrating the 50th year of the Vatican II document on the Liturgy (titled Sacrosanctum Concilium) one of the speakers, Archbishop Piero Marini indicated that “The reforms launched by the Second Vatican Council are not behind us but ahead of us.”

An image of  Vatican II posted by http://calnewman.org/vatican-ii/

Given all that has happened so far in the pontificate of Francis, I agree with the Archbishop. I believe (and I hope) that the reforms envisioned by the Second Vatican Council may begin to see the light of day—to the glory of God and for the welfare of all God’s people, and indeed, of all creation.

The full report of the Archbishop’s remarks (and others, too) is made by The Catholic Herald.co.ukVatican II’s reforms are still ahead of us, says Archbishop Marini.

Here are some other points to consider from this report:

  • The ongoing reform of the liturgy and sacraments will continue to impact all areas of ministry done by the church, inspiring hope
  • There is (apparently) a growing voice within Roman Catholicism to restore the ‘Sacraments of Initiation’ to a more ancient order: baptism-confirmation-eucharist (in contrast to the current order of baptism-eucharist-confirmation)
  • A hope was expressed (in so many words) that the church follow the lead of the Pope and understand that there are no “outsiders.”

As we listen to the Spirit and share with each other, this will certainly become a theme to explore. What do you think?

Goats and Chickens

A boy with a goat in Kenya, thanks to ERD

Early in October the folks at Episcopal Relief and Development invited those who would listen to make a Gift for Life as a good way to remember and honor “The Poor Man” of Assisi (St. Francis):

Today [October 4th] a very peculiar saint will be honored throughout the Christian world. Although he was from a wealthy family, he chose to live in poverty. He preached to a Sultan in Egypt, a flock of birds in the trees, and a ferocious wolf. He founded orders for men and women, and in 2013 a Pope took his name for the first time. Each year, he is honored far and wide with blessings of animals. He is St. Francis, the gentle man from 13th century Assisi, Italy. We invite you to honor him by increasing opportunities for others with the gift of a cow, a chicken, a pig, or my favorite, a goat!
—Sean McConnell, Engagement Director for ERD in a Facebook Post

On two Sundays our Sunday Morning Forum group gathered up just under $100 and with a little help beyond the Forum we made a donation to purchase and send a goat and some chickens to help feed brothers and sisters far from the Coachella Valley and St. Margaret’s.

2013-1015 ERD Donation

To make this gift go even further, generous donors to ERD have pledged to match gifts made to ERD between now and December 6th. So, we’re able to send out 2 goats and twice as many chickens as our small part of the global efforts of ERD.

To all who have this possible: Thank you. Keep it going: make your own gift to ERD as a way of doing good today, and tomorrow!

Photo: Episcopal Relief & Development

Wind Chimes: 3 September 2013

candle001

Lord, make us instruments of your peace.
Where there is hatred, let us sow love;
where there is injury, pardon;
where there is discord, union;
where there is doubt, faith;
where there is despair, hope;
where there is darkness, light;
where there is sadness, joy.
Grant that we may not so much seek to be consoled as to console;
to be understood as to understand;
to be loved as to love.
For it is in giving that we receive;
it is in pardoning that we are pardoned;
and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life.

I light my prayer candle today for those who seek to ‘wage peace.’ Join me in helping the peacemakers in this and every nation, especially in Syria, have the “courage to will and persevere” in their efforts and be acclaimed “blessed” by God and by their neighbors (you and me). ~daniel rondeau

DivLine360x12“Blessed are the peacemakers,” “they are children of God,”
this is the song of the chimes today.
What do you hear?

The prayer, “Attributed to St. Francis,” may be found in the (Episcopal) Book of Common Prayer on page 833.

Wind Chimes: 29 August 2013

divergent-paths

“It’s one thing to feel that you are on the right path,
but it’s another to think yours is the only path.”

A Facebook Post by
Spirituality & Practice

This quote reminded me to re-read a post made by a new desert friend, Paul Kowalewski, who posts regularly on The Desert Retreat House. Paul’s post Buddha Christ spoke about his journey on ‘the way.’ He tells people now that he is a “Christian Buddhist.”

“The disciple is to walk on a path leading to the discovery of one’s own ‘Buddha nature,’ one’s own ‘Christ nature'” according to Paul (and I agree).

And what does this “way” look like?

Do unto others as you would have them do to you. (Jesus)
Consider others as yourself. (Buddha)

If anyone strikes you on the cheek, offer the other also. (Jesus)
If anyone should give you a blow with his hand, with a stick, or with a knife, you should abandon any desires and utter no evil words. (Buddha)

Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you. (Jesus)
Hatreds do not ever cease in this world by hating, but by love. (Buddha)

Just as you did it to one of the least of these, you did it to me. (Jesus)
Whoever would tend me, he should tend the sick. (Buddha)

Why do you see the speck in your neighbor’s eye, but do not notice the log in your own. (Jesus)
The faults of others are easier to see than your own. (Buddha)

Go. Read Paul’s post, Buddha Christ. On your journey: who has walked with you? Who has taught you? Who has enkindled faith, hope, and love as you make your way home?

DivLine360x12No one owns the sounds of the chimes, they simply dance with the wind and play, delighting those who pause to listen.
What do you hear?