Wind Chimes: 10 Nov 2012

renew in us … the gift of joy and wonder in all your works

Adapted from the Prayer for the Newly Baptized

Slow down today. Make time to pause and look (chimes can be beautiful as they move) and listen. What do you see? What do you hear? How will you respond?

A prayer

God, great and wonderful,
who hast created the heavens,
dwelling in the light and beauty thereof,
who hast made the earth,
revealing thyself in every flower that opens;
let not mine eyes be blind to thee,
neither let mine heart be dead,
but teach me to praise thee,
even as the lark which offereth her song at daybreak.

Isidore of Seville (560-636)
in Christopher Herbert, Pocket Prayers: The Classic Collection (Kindle Edition)

Video: RANphotovideo on YouTube

Wind Chimes: 6 Oct 2012

Straw Flower by Pat Bailey
Straw Flower. Photo: Pat Bailey on ‘I Miss Me Too’

Here is today’s sampling of the music made by the Spirit in the Wind Chimes.
What do you hear?

A visual delight, and more

I encourage you to visit the blog I Miss Me Too (renamed A New Day on 9/29/12) by Patricia C. Bailey. Pat lives with the pain of Fibromyalgia and the every day challenges of ‘Chronic Illness.’ Here is (part of) what she said about a rose pictured in her post Floral Friday: Finding Myself

I think this rose best portrays who I am. It is open, showing the complexity of the inner. The inner seems to have a cross, as my faith is very central to who I am but I don’t proclaim it loudly. It is rather private. The outer is loose and gentle and freely unfurling. Even though I am in my late 60′s there is still some unfurling to do. I am still in the process. I can also be a bit prickly if people try to hold on too tightly or are careless around me. It helps people remember to play nice.

A short prayer for those living with chronic illness

Support and encourage those who live with chronic illness; strengthen those who endure continual pain, and give them hope; grant the refreshment of peaceful sleep to all who suffer—we pray to you, O God…
from A Litany of Healing in Enriching Our Worship 2 (a prayer book of the Episcopal Church), pp. 30-32

William Tyndale remembered today, October 6th

Preparations to burn the body of William Tyndale. John Foxe’s Book of Martyrs, 1563. Image: Wikimedia Commons

At the risk of his own life William Tyndale translated the Bible into English from the Hebrew and Greek texts available in his day. What he began in the 16th century has blossomed in the 21st century.

“in whom we live and move and have our being” was first penned by William Tyndale. You may be surprised by the legacy on the English Language left by this man. Join others in giving thanks today for his scholarship, his courage, his faith, his desire to make the Word of God known.